Sources in the BCS world

20 02 2010

Topic: Should the US government mandate a post-season college football playoff to decide a true national champion?

Title: H.R. 390: College Football Playoff Act of 2009

Civic Impulse, LLC , Feb. 5, 2010

http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=h111-390

Accessed: Feb. 11, 2010

Category: Institutional; a website to help the public research and track the activities in the U.S. Congress.

Summary: The bill known as H.R. 390 wants to prohibit, as an unfair and deceptive act or practice, the promotion, marketing, and advertising of any post-season NCAA Division I football game as a national championship game unless such game is the culmination of a fair and equitable playoff system. In its first step in the legislative process, a subcommittee forwarded the bill to a full committee by a voice vote.

Summary of sources:

Joe Barton [R-TX6]

John Carter [R-TX31]

Cynthia Lummis [R-WY]

Michael McCaul [R-TX10]

Gary Miller [R-CA42]

Bobby Rush [D-IL1]

The Library of Congress – Thomas

These sources represent the co-sponsors of the bill H.R. 390 who will deliberate, investigate, and revise the bill before it goes to a general debate as well the official link to the government website showing the details of the bill.

Source Analysis

Civic Impulse LLC claims to be an independent, non-partisan, and open-source website that was launched in September 2004. GovTrack.us provides a comprehensive legislative tracking tool for everyday citizens to track the activities in the U.S. Congress. The information shown on this site is assembled in an automated way from official websites (primarily from the website THOMAS, the official website for the status of legislation run by the Library of Congress, but a full list of sources is on the credits page).

Usefulness

The legislation H.R. 390 is currently in deliberation and was forwarded to a full committee as of Feb 5, 2010. The tracking tool has up to date information on H.R. 390 and its progress with Congress within 24 hours. GovTrack.us is a reliable source that uses the Library of Congress – THOMAS website as its official and verifiable source.

Works Cited

“College Football Playoff Act of 2009.” THOMAS (Library of Congress). 9 Jan. 2009. Web. 12 Feb. 2010. <http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/z?c111:h390:&gt;.

“GovTrack Credits.” GovTrack.us: Tracking the U.S. Congress. 2009. Web. 12 Feb. 2010. <http://www.govtrack.us/credits.xpd&gt;.

“H.R. 390: College Football Playoff Act of 2009.” GovTrack.us: Tracking the U.S. Congress. 5 Feb. 2010. Web. 12 Feb. 2010. <http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=h111-390&gt;.

Topic: Should the US government mandate a post-season college football playoff to decide a true national champion?

Title: News Room – The Senator’s Press Releases

Hatch.Senate.gov; Jan. 29, 2010

http://hatch.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=PressReleases.Detail&PressRelease_id=7c6d164a-1b78-be3e-e012-d3c7b78ddb2a

Accessed: Feb. 11, 2010

Category: Institutional; a press release from Senator Orrin Hatch, also a PDF letter to Hatch from the Department of Justice.

Summary: Senator Orrin Hatch summarizes a letter he received from the U.S. Department of Justice about his concerns regarding the fairness and legality of the BCS as well as his characterization of the Obama Administration’s willingness to work toward a solution. Hatch believes the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) violates anti-trust laws and is pleased that the Obama administration is looking into alternative ways to confront what he believes as “tremendous inequities.”

Summary of sources:

Senator Orrin G. Hatch

Department Of Justice

Assistant Attorney General Ronald Weich

President Barack Obama

These sources represent the official information from the Senator proposing change, the Department of Justice’s official response to the proposal and the President’s official stance on the issue of a college football playoff.

Source Analysis

The officially sponsored government site of Orrin Hatch has the background information of the senator and serves as his outlet for press releases regarding his agenda. Hatch is a Republican and has served the state of Utah since 1977.

Usefulness

The summary by Hatch clearly defines his position against the BCS in a transparent way. The linked PDF document from the Justice Department responds directly to Hatch and officially defines the government’s position regarding this public policy issue. The document does not fully give the opposition side of the BCS debate.

Works Cited

“Fast Facts About Sen. Orrin Hatch.” US Senator Orrin Hatch. Web. 12 Feb. 2010. <http://hatch.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=Biography.FastFacts&gt;.

“Obama Administration Mulling Action Against BCS.” US Senator Orrin Hatch. 29 Jan. 2010. Web. 12 Feb. 2010. <http://hatch.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=PressReleases.Detail&PressRelease_id=7c6d164a-1b78-be3e-e012-d3c7b78ddb2a&gt;.

Topic: Should the US government mandate a post-season college football playoff to decide a true national champion?

Title: Rose Bowl as a playoff quarterfinal? Not!

Los Angeles Times; June 25, 2009

Mike Hiserman

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/sports_blog/2009/06/rose-bowl-as-a-playoff-quarterfinal-not.html

Accessed: Feb. 11, 2010

Category: Mainstream Journalistic; a blog entry from the Los Angeles Times online.

Summary: The Bowl Championship Series (BCS) isn’t going to disappear without a fight. The BCS Presidential Oversight Committee responded to its critics and laid-out its position in regards to a post-season playoff in college football. The current chair and former University of Oregon president Dave Frohnmayer said that an NFL-style playoff system would not work. He stated that, “…they disrespect our academic calendars and they utterly lack a business plan.” Frohnmayer believes that the current bowl system has too much tradition and that turning the current bowl system into a quarterfinal would be “ridiculous.”

Summary of sources:

Mike Hiserman, LA Times reporter

Dave Frohnmayer, former Chair of BCS Oversight Committee

BCS Oversight Committee

Los Angeles Times

These sources represent the official response from the BCS Oversight Committee to BCS pundits, the blogger quoting the chair of the BCS Oversight Committee and the LA Times publishing the information to the public.

Source Analysis

The Los Angeles Times claims more than 18 million readers. Although it started as a newspaper for residents of Los Angeles in the 1800s, it has grown to be a newspaper of record for the nation, and estimates its growth to be 23 million readers by 2030. Mike Hiserman moved from senior sports editor to deputy editor of the LA Times in December 2008. Dave Frohnmayer was the chair of the BCS Oversight Committee and is the former University of Oregon president.

Usefulness

The LA Times blog reported a BCS proponent’s view of a post-season playoff in college football. The story is similar to one that appeared on ESPN.com. The articles had quotes from the chair of the BCS Oversight Committee endorsing the current BCS system, but did not articulate specifics as to why current playoff proposals were not in the best interest of academics or revenue earning potential.

Works Cited

“Dave Frohnmayer | Robert D. Clark Honors College.” Home | Robert D. Clark Honors College. Winter 2010. Web. 12 Feb. 2010. <http://honors.uoregon.edu/faculty/dave-frohnmayer&gt;.

Harvey, Randy. “New duties for Sports editors Mike Hiserman, Debbie Goffa.” Top of the Ticket | Rep. Patrick Kennedy, Edward Kennedy’s son, opts to retire at 42. 4 Dec. 2008. Web. 12 Feb. 2010. <http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/readers/2008/12/mike-hiserman-n.html&gt;.

Hiserman, Mike. “Rose Bowl as a playoff quarterfinal? Not!” Latimesblogs.latimes.com. 25 June 2009. Web. 12 Feb. 2010. <http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/sports_blog/2009/06/rose-bowl-as-a-playoff-quarterfinal-not.html&gt;.

“Los Angeles Times/MEDIA GROUP: SPEAK L.A.” LA Times Media Kit. 2008. Web. 12 Feb. 2010. <http://webapp1.latimes.com/mediakit/the_market.html&gt;.

Watson, Graham. “BCS Presidential Oversight Committee denies MWC’s proposal.” ESPN: The Worldwide Leader In Sports. 25 June 2009. Web. 12 Feb. 2010. <http://espn.go.com/blog/ncfnation/post/_/id/4762/bcs-presidential-oversight-committee-denies-mwc-s-proposal&gt;.

Topic: Should the US government mandate a post-season college football playoff to decide a true national champion?

Title: Obama Calls For NCAA Playoffs

YouTube; Nov 17, 2008

Steve Kroft; Barack Obama

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3WDuQe89kJM

Accessed: Feb. 11, 2010

Category: Mainstream Journalistic; a video clip of a broadcast interview from the CBS network show 60 Minutes.

Summary: Then President-Elect Barack Obama responds to a question from reporter Steve Kroft about his plan for a post-season college football playoff to determine a national champion. Obama intimates that since there is no clear, decisive winner; there should be an eight-team playoff, with three rounds to determine a national champion. He feels that it would only add three extra weeks to the season and that the solution is that the regular season could be trimmed back to accommodate this change. Obama said about playoffs, “I’m going to throw my weight around a little bit, I think it’s the right thing to do.”

Summary of sources:

President Barack Obama

Steve Kroft, reporter for 60 Minutes

CBS, network television broadcaster

YouTube.com

These sources represent the official stance on the topic of a college football playoff by the President of the United States, the news reporter eliciting the president’s response to questions about college football, the network broadcasting the original report and the online site YouTube.com rebroadcasting the original interview.

Source Analysis

Barack Obama was at the time of the video, the President-Elect, and gave his opinion when asked about a college football playoff. Steve Kroft was named a “60 Minutes” correspondent in May 1989 and has been in broadcasting for 21 years. Kroft was chosen for the 2010 Paul White Award in 2010. The CBS network is a mass media company that dates back to the beginnings of the broadcasting industry. CBS broadcasts in all 50 states and key international markets as well as owning many subsidiaries nationally and globally. YouTube.com was founded February 2005 and quickly became the leader in online video viewing. Google Inc. purchased the company in November 2006.

Usefulness

The interview depicts a tongue-in-cheek conversation with the president regarding his opinion on a post-season college football playoff. Obama advocates that change is needed in all areas of America, including entertainment. The president feels confident in his conviction because he describes that he has not met a serious college football fan that has disagreed with him. Obama gives one-sided ideas for a plan of action, but does not talk specifics about academics or financial distribution that BCS proponents say have not been properly addressed.

Works Cited

“Company History.” YouTube – Broadcast Yourself. 2010. Web. 12 Feb. 2010. <http://www.youtube.com/t/company_history&gt;.

“Obama Calls For NCAA Playoffs.” YouTube – Broadcast Yourself. 17 Nov. 2008. Web. 12 Feb. 2010. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3WDuQe89kJM&gt;.

“Overview.” CBS Corporation | Home. 2010. Web. 12 Feb. 2010. <http://www.cbscorporation.com/ourcompany.php?id=11&gt;.

“President Barack Obama.” The White House. Web. 12 Feb. 2010. <http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/president-obama&gt;.

“Steve Kroft.” CBSNews.com. 2010. Web. 12 Feb. 2010. <http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/1998/07/09/60minutes/main13544.shtml&gt;.

Topic: Should the US government mandate a post-season college football playoff to decide a true national champion?

Title: BCS chief: System is in school’s best interest

The San Jose Mercury News, Jan 7, 2010

Ralph D. Russo

http://www.mercurynews.com/search/ci_14141956?IADID=Search-www.mercurynews.com-www.mercurynews.com;

Accessed: Feb. 11, 2010

Category: Mainstream Journalistic; news report from the web version of the Mercury News.

Summary: The Bowl Championship Series (BCS) executive director Bill Hancock says that the 120 schools that play in the Football Bowl Subdivision are at a consensus with the way the post-season is played. Hancock articulated that a playoff would lead to more injures, conflict with academic exams, make the current bowl system defunct all while minimizing the importance of the regular season. Hancock concedes that the BCS’ position is not a popular one, but that he feels it is in the best interests of the universities. He also argues that the popularity of college football has never been higher and that is all in part to the BCS. The BCS director says that making the selection process for the BCS bowls more transparent is on the list of for changes.

Summary of sources:

Bill Hancock, BCS Executive Director

Ralph D. Russo, AP College Football Writer

The San Jose Mercury News

These sources represent the official stance on the topic of a college football playoff by the BCS Executive Director, the news reporter writing the story, and the newspaper company that published the story online.

Source Analysis

Bill Hancock is the BCS Executive Director who is also the main spokesperson for the group. Hancock also assisted the US Olympic Committee media officers during the 2004 Summer Olympics during his career. Ralph D. Russo is a regular writer for the San Jose Mercury News sports section. The San Jose Mercury News is a subsidiary of MediaNews Group, which claims to have a combined daily, and Sunday circulation of approximately 2.4 million and 2.7 million throughout the U.S.

Usefulness

The report records Hancock’s rebuttal to pundits of the BCS. The story chronicles Hancock’s rise to new position of BCS executive director, which details his proposed agenda to serve the interests of universities. The story gives background information about the television contract change with Disney-owned ESPN starting the 2010 season. The story does not interview critics but references oppositional standpoints within the article in relation to Hancock’s quotes. The article fails to report about the disparity of dollars the automatic qualifying conferences receive versus the non-automatic conferences.

Works Cited

“About NewsMedia Group.” Media News Group. 2007. Web. 12 Feb. 2010. <http://www.medianewsgroup.com/about/&gt;.

Gregory, Sean. “Can a Good Guy Like Bill Hancock Fix the BCS?” TIME.com. 26 Nov. 2009. Web. 12 Feb. 2010. <http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1941662,00.html&gt;.

Russo, Ralph D. “BCS chief: System is in schools’ best interest.” San Jose Mercury News. 7 Jan. 2010. Web. 12 Feb. 2010. <http://www.mercurynews.com/search/ci_14141956?IADID=Search-www.mercurynews.com-www.mercurynews.com&gt;.

Topic: Should the US government mandate a post-season college football playoff to decide a true national champion?

Title: An interview with Stewart Mandel

Interview Feb. 12, 2010

Bob Rodgers, interviewer. Stewart Mandel, Senior writer for SI.com, interviewee.

Accessed: Feb. 12, 2010

Category: Citizen; expert, non-stakeholder.

Summary: Mandel believes that although people criticize the BCS, it’s still better than the old system without a championship game. He feels that because of the BCS, college football has increased in popularity more than any other sport since its inception in 1998. Mandel also says that money is the main motivating factor as to why there isn’t a playoff. He says that many universities use the business model of having the college football regular season pay for most or all of the other athletic programs of the school and that a playoff realistically could devalue the current regular season business model. Mandel also thought that politicians supported a BCS change to appease their constituents. Current BCS conferences would stand to lose the most if a playoff was implemented because they control the flow of money and it would have to be opened up to the other non-BCS conferences. Mandel also said that the major bowl games have been around for 70-100 years and have been doing business with the higher-ups at universities to keep current system intact. Mandel provided history stating that an anti-trust law is what opened up conferences to gain more power than the NCAA itself when governing its own marketability and now the BCS.

Summary of sources:

Stewart Mandel

This source represents a non-stakeholder expert of the college football industry.

Source Analysis

Stewart Mandel is a senior writer at SI.com covering college football and basketball. Mandel has worked with Sports Illustrated since 1999. Mandel is also the author of the book Bowls, Polls & Tattered Souls: Tackling the Chaos and Controversy That Reign Over College Football. In 2008, he took first place (enterprise category) and second place (game story) in the Football Writers Association of America’s annual writing contest. He also placed first in the 2005 contest (columns).

Usefulness

The interview provided a less reported angle regarding the awareness that college presidents have in the business model that surrounds college football. Mandel also gives an insightful history of how the BCS eventually formed and why the system is governed in its current form. The interview gives the perspective of a journalist that covers the sport for a living. While Mandel makes a living writing about college football, he is not a stakeholder like a university president or athletic director.

Works Cited

“An Interview With Stewart Mandel.” Telephone interview. 12 Feb. 2010.

Mandel, Stewart. “Bowls, polls & tattered souls…” Google Books. 2007. Web. 13 Feb. 2010. <http://books.google.com/books?id=yM7kIhmEIvUC&lpg=PP1&ots=VWBp2HUc4K&dq=bowls%20polls%20and%20tattered%20souls&pg=PP1#v=onepage&q=&f=false>.

Mandel, Stewart. “Stewart Mandel – Writer Archive.” SI.com. 2010. Web. 13 Feb. 2010. <http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/writers/stewart_mandel/archive/index.html&gt;.

Topic: Should the US government mandate a post-season college football playoff to decide a true national champion?

Title: Bowls, Polls, and Tattered Souls: Tackling the Chaos and Controversy that Reign Over College Football, August 31, 2007

Mandel, Stewart

Accessed: Feb. 12, 2010

Category: Academic; book describing the intricacies of college football.

Summary: Mandel covers the biggest controversies and pressing questions in the sport of college football. In the first chapter, he explains the complexity of the Bowl Championship Series (BCS), how it came to be, who would be the winners and losers of the system if changed and his expertise on why the system will not be changed easily.  Mandel also explains how rankings work within college football and how it is applicable to the popularity contest of the BCS.

Summary of sources:

Stewart Mandel

BCS

NCAA

football conferences

This sources represent a writer who has researched many topics that encompass college football. These topics include the system that determines a championship, the association that governs college athletics and their relationship to the conferences that align universities regionally.

Source Analysis

Stewart Mandel is a senior writer at SI.com covering college football and basketball. Mandel has worked with Sports Illustrated since 1999. In 2008, he took first place (enterprise category) and second place (game story) in the Football Writers Association of America’s annual writing contest. He also placed first in the 2005 contest (columns). The writer has done research and provides facts to persuade readers to his see his point of view.

Usefulness

The book provides many facts that back up his opinion that he is in favor of a post-season playoff. Mandel also gives an insightful history of how the BCS eventually formed and why the system is governed in its current form. The book gives the perspective of a journalist that covers and researches the sport for a living. While Mandel makes a living writing about college football, he is not a stakeholder like a university president or athletic director.

Works Cited

Mandel, Stewart. Bowls, Polls, and Tattered Souls Tackling the Chaos and Controversy that Reign Over College Football. New York: Wiley, 2007. Print.

Mandel, Stewart. “Stewart Mandel – Writer Archive.” SI.com. 2010. Web. 13 Feb. 2010. <http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/writers/stewart_mandel/archive/index.html&gt;.

Topic: Should the US government mandate a post-season college football playoff to decide a true national champion?

Title: BCS governance

Jan. 21, 2010

Bowl Championship Series

http://www.bcsfootball.org/news/story?id=4809846

Accessed: Feb. 12, 2010

Category: Institutional; report from the official website of the BCS stating its governance.

Summary: A public record from the BCS about how decisions are made within the group and who specifically governs it, which includes biographies of each individual. The conference commissioners and the Notre Dame athletic director make decisions regarding all BCS issues, in consultation with an athletic director advisory group and subject to the approval of a presidential oversight committee, whose members represent all 120 Football Bowl Subdivision programs.

Summary of sources:

Presidential Oversight Committee

Conference Commissioners and Notre Dame athletic director

Athletic Director Advisory Group

BCS executive director

These sources represent the current and official leaders of the BCS organization that governs college football’s national championship and four other marquee post-season bowl games.

Source Analysis

The Bowl Championship Series is an organization comprised of representatives from 11 NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision conferences (formerly Division 1-A) and independent school, the University of Notre Dame, to administer five marquee post-season bowl games. One of the five post-season bowl games determines the current national championship by matching the two top teams by BCS metrics. The BCS provides transparent information as to its governance.

Usefulness

The site provides transparent information as to how governance is comprised and who currently resides as administrators in the BCS organization complete with biographies. The report does not provide transparent information on how much power each committee has in the decision making process or what directives the organization uses to make decisions.

Works Cited

“BCS governance.” BCS: News, highlights and insights into the Bowl Championship Series. 21 Jan. 2010. Web. 12 Feb. 2010. <http://www.bcsfootball.org/news/story?id=4809846&gt;.

“The BCS is …” BCS: News, highlights and insights into the Bowl Championship Series. 21 Jan. 2010. Web. 12 Feb. 2010. <http://www.bcsfootball.org/news/story?id=4809716&gt;.

Topic: Should the US government mandate a post-season college football playoff to decide a true national champion?

Title: Government To Look at B.C.S.

New York Times, Jan. 30, 2010

Associated Press

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/30/sports/ncaafootball/30sportsbriefs-bcs.html

Accessed: Feb. 12, 2010

Category: Mainstream Journalistic; news report found in the Academic Search Premier Database from the New York Times.

Summary: Assistant Attorney General Ronald Weich wrote a letter to Senator Orrin Hatch saying that the Obama Administration was looking into the legality of the Bowl Championship Series. Possible actions against the BCS would be the Justice Department looking into antitrust law violations and the Federal Trade Commission reviewing the legality under consumer protection laws.

Summary of sources:

Bowl Championship Series

Ronald Weich, Assistant Attorney General

Orrin Hatch, Utah Senator

US Department of Justice

US Federal Trade Commission

Associated Press

These sources represent an organization under scrutiny by the Senator from Utah, the Assistant Attorney General responding to the request from the senator and the possible government agencies looking into the legalities of the public policy issue.

Source Analysis

The New York Times claims more than 14 million online readers and is widely considered a reliable source for national news.

Usefulness

The report told of the Obama administration giving the go-ahead to the DOJ and the FTC to investigate the legality of the BCS. Hatch asked for an investigation and Weich responded in a letter confirming the US government would look into the organization. The article follows similar types of stories written by other national and regional newspapers about the government investigating post-season college football issues. [Sports Illustrated, Wall Street Journal] The report does not give any comment from BCS officials.

Works Cited

Everson, Darren. “U.S. May Examine College Bowl System.” The Wall Street Journal. 31 Jan. 2010. Web. 14 Feb. 2010. <http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704491604575035493947416852.html&gt;.

“Online Audience Profile.” NYTimes.com. Mar. 2009. Web. 15 Feb. 2010. <http://www.nytimes.whsites.net/mediakit/online/audience/audience_profile.php&gt;.

Staples, Andy. “Barack Obama, Justice Department could turn BCS into playoff.” SI.com. 1 Feb. 2010. Web. 15 Feb. 2010. <http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2010/writers/andy_staples/02/01/bcs-justice/index.html&gt;.

THE ASSOCIATED, PRESS. “Government To Look at B.C.S.” New York Times 30 Jan. 2010: 5. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Web. 14 Feb. 2010.

Topic: Should the US government mandate a post-season college football playoff to decide a true national champion?

Title: Non-BCS conferences get record payout

ESPN, Jan. 27, 2010

ESPN.com news services

http://sports.espn.go.com/dallas/ncf/news/story?id=4856300

Accessed: Feb. 12, 2010

Category: Mainstream Journalistic; news report explaining the breakdown of BCS payouts

Summary: The six automatic qualifying Bowl Championship Series conferences earned a combined $115.2 million in BCS payouts while the five non-automatic qualifying conferences earned only $24 million. The disparity between money distribution has come under fire from congress but is defended by BCS executive director Bill Hancock as “fair and appropriate.” Senator Orrin Hatch described the BCS as an economic cartel.

Summary of sources:

Bill Hancock, BCS executive director

Orrin Hatch, Utah Senator

Bowl Championship Series

ESPN.com news services

Associated Press

These sources represent the facts regarding payouts to various football conferences and the BCS executive director justifying his organization’s money distribution system. A senator responds to the numbers reported.

Source Analysis

ESPN television programming is received by more than 97 million households and has 30 years of experience reporting sports news. In 1995, the Walt Disney Company bought ESPN and combined it with ABC Sports into one entity.

Usefulness

The report lists the money disparity between automatic qualifying conferences and non-automatic qualifying. The report gives traction to critics of the BCS with quantifiable numbers that the revenue distribution is skewed towards automatic qualifying conferences. The article gives voice to the BCS with his rebuttal to critics. Hancock says that the non-automatic conferences earned more money than ever before while Senator Orrin Hatch stated that the BCS divides the money to “the privileged conferences at the expense of the nonprivileged conferences.” The article gives a voice to all sides of the debate.

Works Cited

“2009-10 revenue distribution data.” BCSFootball.org. 29 Jan. 2010. Web. 15 Feb. 2010. <http://www.bcsfootball.org/news/story?id=4856975&gt;.

“ESPN’s corporate history.” Marketplace from American Public Media. 4 Sept. 2009. Web. 15 Feb. 2010. <http://marketplace.publicradio.org/display/web/2009/09/04/pm-corner-office-bodenheimer-espn/&gt;.

“TCU, Boise State drive non-BCS record cash haul of $24 million – ESPN Dallas.” ESPN.com. 27 Jan. 2010. Web. 14 Feb. 2010. <http://sports.espn.go.com/dallas/ncf/news/story?id=4856300&gt;.

Advertisements